Sunday, July 10, 2011

Temperature dependency of Transitions Lenses

All Transitions lenses are temperature-dependent. Temperature affects the degree to which your lenses darken and the speed with which they clear again.

In cold temperatures, Transitions Lenses will get darker. At very high temperatures, Transitions Lenses will not be as dark due to the thermal process affecting the molecules. This is a normal reaction for photochromic lenses.

Experts recommend that wearers exposed to extreme conditions (beach, watersports, skiing...) consider a second pair of polarized prescription sunglasses.

Temperature dependence experiment in transitions lenses

Gauging the effects of temperature:

The darkness of the lens is dependent on the number of photochromic molecules open at any given time. In hotter temperatures-- think of a pot of boiling water—the molecules have more energy and are closing at a faster rate. Therefore, although the amount of light energy (sunlight) present is the same, the number of open molecules on a hot day is less than the number of open molecules on a very cold day. This is why a photochromic lens is darkest in cold temperatures and returns to clear quicker in warmer temperatures.

Transitions lenses are the number one recommended photochromic lens worldwide. Our scientists are always challenging themselves to improve our photochromic technology and create products with improved temperature independency. In fact, the latest Transitions lenses become 10 percent darker in hot temperatures than the previous generation.

6 comments:

  1. Photochromic Lensesyou can enjoy convenience, style and comfort, all in one frame.

    ReplyDelete
  2. So, what this video is saying is that photochromic lenses don't work so well when it's hot, in summer when you want them to be at their darkest, and don't work very well in winter, when you want them to be at their lightest.

    This is exactly my experience: on a cold, overcast, dull winter's day my lenses go really dark and make everything look even gloomier and on a really bright at the beach I need to put on my polaroids!

    So, after hoping that I could manage with just one set of prescription lenses, I've ended up with three pairs of specs: clear lenses for winter, photochromic lenses for general summer use, polaroids for driving or walking in really bright sunshine.
    Chris S

    ReplyDelete
  3. So, what this video is saying is that photochromic lenses don't work so well when it's hot, in summer when you want them to be at their darkest, and don't work very well in winter, when you want them to be at their lightest.

    This is exactly my experience: on a cold, overcast, dull winter's day my lenses go really dark and make everything look even gloomier and on a really bright at the beach I need to put on my polaroids!

    So, after hoping that I could manage with just one set of prescription lenses, I've ended up with three pairs of specs: clear lenses for winter, photochromic lenses for general summer use, polaroids for driving or walking in really bright sunshine.
    Chris S

    ReplyDelete
  4. Yes, I just tried the latest (and "darkest) Transitions XTRActive lenses in the hot Phoenix summer and they got a nice tint where anyone can still see your eyes completely from the outside. They weren't even as dark as the Transitions Drivewear lenses. I had to return them and get a dedicated prescription sunglass, similar to the Ray-Ban lenses my frame came with.

    ReplyDelete
  5. so its safe to say they havent perfected the tecknology were it really matters in sunny hot temperatures all you get is a fade......please transitions company quit the fake ads to your customers

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I finally got a call back from a Transitions rep and she said they've greatly improved them to withstand temperatures in the mid to upper 80 degrees. Really?!? Our overnight LOW in the summer can be greater than that. These would only be good as winter glasses here.

      Delete

Please write your comments here...